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Quiero compartir con los  lectores de MinoriaDeUno.com,   el Informe de La sociedad Americana de Ingenieros Civiles sobre la infra-estructura de Puerto Rico. Es del 2019. Aqui tienen el link: file:https://infrastructurereportcard.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/2019-Puerto-Rico-Report-Card-Final.pdfFinal.pdf El informe no tuvo difusión alguna, ni tracción por los devastador que es . Fue ingnorado por la prensa, el gobierno y la sociedad Civil! Después nos quejamos como está el estado de la infra-estruftiura de Puerto Rico.  Es un Pliego acusatorio del mal gobierno y de la corrupción gubernamental. Todo aquel que atesores a Puerto Rico debe leerlo y exigir a los oficiales del gobierrno territorial y Federal que le rindan cuenta a nuestro Pueblo. Ahora que el Congreso está aprobando un paquete de más de mil 200 billones para la infraestructura de la Nación, los estados y sus terriotorios la sociedad civil debe ser vigilante del buen uso de las asignaciones que se le van  a dar a Puerto Rico. hay que evitar que los cabros de la corrupcion malgastan y se roben el dinero. Es hora de actuar o perdemos a Puerto Rico y a su población. Franklin Délano López

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GRADING SCALE

EXCEPTIONAL: FIT FOR THE FUTURE
The infrastructure in the system or network is generally in excellent condition, typically new or
recently rehabilitated, and meets capacity needs for the future. A few elements show signs of
general deterioration that require attention. Facilities meet modern standards for functionality and
resilient to withstand most disasters and severe weather events.



GOOD: ADEQUATE FOR NOW
The infrastructure in the system or network is in good to excellent condition; some elements show
signs of general deterioration that require attention. A few elements exhibit significant deficiencies.
Safe and reliable with minimal capacity issues and minimal risk.




MEDIOCRE: REQUIRES ATTENTION
The infrastructure in the system or network is in fair to good condition; it shows general signs of
deterioration and requires attention. Some elements exhibit significant deficiencies in conditions
and functionality, with increasing vulnerability to risk.




POOR: AT RISK
The infrastructure is in poor to fair condition and mostly below standard, with many elements
approaching the end of their service life. A large portion of the system exhibits significant
deterioration. Condition and capacity are of significant concern with strong risk of failure.




FAILING/CRITICAL: UNFIT FOR PURPOSE

The infrastructure in the system is in unacceptable condition with widespread advanced signs of
deterioration. Many of the components of the system exhibit signs of imminent failure.

 

Puerto Rico Infrastructure Grades: Notas de puerto Rico y la condicion de su infraestructura!

Bridges ( Puentes)
D+
Dams ( Represas)
D+
Drinking Water (Agua Potable)
D
Energy (Energia)
F
Ports ( Puertos)
D
Roads Carreteras)
D-
Solid Waste( Desperdicios sólidos)
D-
Wastewater(  Aguas negras)
D+

INTRODUCTION
Infrastructure is central to quality of life and economic development. Households receive a wide range of goods and
services thanks to infrastructure, including fresh fruit and vegetables, water, electronics, and textile goods. Meanwhile,
infrastructure can reduce fixed costs of production for businesses, especially costs associated with transportation, which
tend to be a determinant of business location. Simply put, infrastructure matters to people and businesses all around.


Puerto Rico is no exception. The quality of infrastructure is essential in the daily lives of the people of Puerto Rico, and
this was all too evident when Hurricanes Maria and Irma devastated the island in 2017. Two years removed from the
storms, rebuilding our infrastructure remains a work in progress. Unfortunately, constant failures in the energy system,
prevalent poor conditions in the road network, and notable deferred maintenance across public buildings impact daily
functions, mobility and productivity. They serve as vivid reminders of the need to increase investment in infrastructure,
employ better maintenance practices, and develop smarter policy.


The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), founded in 1852, is the oldest national professional engineering society in
the United States. ASCE represents more than 150,000 members of the civil engineering profession in 177 countries. The
Puerto Rico Section is commemorating its 90th anniversary with the release of the first Report Card for Puerto Rico’s
Infrastructure. The ASCE Puerto Rico Section has devoted significant personal time in the development of the
Infrastructure Report Card, in hopes of encouraging smart rebuilding efforts, influencing sound infrastructure policy,
keeping the island competitive, and improving Puerto Ricans quality of life.


Contained in this report card is an analysis of eight categories of infrastructure: bridges, dams, drinking water, energy,
ports, roads, solid waste, and wastewater. However, there are other built networks in Puerto Rico that are vitally
important to public safety and wellbeing that aren’t included in this report. For example, school facilities were critical to
the recovery efforts following the 2017 hurricanes, and many of these buildings need rehabilitation. Coastal infrastructure
serves to safeguard Puerto Rico from storms and sea level rise, as well as protect the environment and foster economic
longevity. There are other areas of significant concern not covered by this report card, including land use planning and a
lack of access to affordable housing. These challenges are critically important but are outside the scope of this ASCE
Infrastructure Report Card.


The 2019 ASCE Report Card for Puerto Rico’s Infrastructure is a simple tool to help residents, businesses, and policymakers
understand the state of the island’s infrastructure and consider solutions to raise the grades. This information is intended
to move the conversation forward about how to rebuild Puerto Rico and improve our economy and quality of life.
















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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Grading Criteria .. 4
Grading Scale ...
5
GPA ...
6
Solutions to Raise the Grades
7
Economic Analysis
8
Bridges
12
Dams
17
Drinking Water .
23
Energy .
28
Ports ... .
34
Roads ....
38
Solid Waste ...
50
Wastewater .....
55 Acknowledgements .. 61


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GRADING CRITERIA
The Report Card Sections are based on the following eight criteria:

CAPACITY Does the infrastructure’s capacity meet current and future demands?


CONDITION What is the infrastructure’s existing and nearfuture physical condition?


FUNDING What is the current level of funding from all levels of government for the infrastructure category
as compared to the estimated funding need?


FUTURE NEED What is the cost to improve the infrastructure? Will future funding prospects address the
need?


OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE What is the owners’ ability to operate and maintain the
infrastructure properly? Is the infrastructure in compliance with government regulations?


PUBLIC SAFETY To what extent is the public’s safety jeopardized by the condition of the infrastructure
and what could be the consequences of failure?


RESILIENCE What is the infrastructure system’s capability to prevent or protect against significant multi
hazard threats and incidents? How able is it to quickly recover and reconstitute critical services with minimum
consequences for public safety and health, the economy, and national security?


INNOVATION What new and innovative techniques, materials, technologies, and delivery methods are
being implemented to improve the infrastructure?


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GRADING SCALE

EXCEPTIONAL: FIT FOR THE FUTURE
The infrastructure in the system or network is generally in excellent condition, typically new or
recently rehabilitated, and meets capacity needs for the future. A few elements show signs of
general deterioration that require attention. Facilities meet modern standards for functionality and
resilient to withstand most disasters and severe weather events.



GOOD: ADEQUATE FOR NOW
The infrastructure in the system or network is in good to excellent condition; some elements show
signs of general deterioration that require attention. A few elements exhibit significant deficiencies.
Safe and reliable with minimal capacity issues and minimal risk.




MEDIOCRE: REQUIRES ATTENTION
The infrastructure in the system or network is in fair to good condition; it shows general signs of
deterioration and requires attention. Some elements exhibit significant deficiencies in conditions
and functionality, with increasing vulnerability to risk.




POOR: AT RISK
The infrastructure is in poor to fair condition and mostly below standard, with many elements
approaching the end of their service life. A large portion of the system exhibits significant
deterioration. Condition and capacity are of significant concern with strong risk of failure.




FAILING/CRITICAL: UNFIT FOR PURPOSE

The infrastructure in the system is in unacceptable condition with widespread advanced signs of
deterioration. Many of the components of the system exhibit signs of imminent failure.




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2019 REPORT CARD FOR PUERTO RICO’S INFRASTRUCTURE



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SOLUTIONS TO RAISE THE GRADE
Increase the resiliency of Puerto Rico’s infrastructure. Our future depends on the ability of our infrastructure to not only
protect us against increasingly severe storms, but to facilitate timely emergency management, response, and recovery
efforts after a major event. The resiliency of all our networks can be improved by requiring the Central Government and
municipalities build to ASCE 7 standards, incorporating lifecycle cost analysis into projects, and by maintaining our existing
assets. Taking these actions will extend the useful life of our assets and decrease costs in the longterm.


Establish a Puerto Rico Infrastructure Plan with a wide variety of stakeholders and experts in the field. Infrastructure
development is a longterm endeavor with significant impacts on economic growth and competitiveness. Puerto Rico
should formulate a general Infrastructure Plan with clear priorities and strategies to achieve them. This plan should be
approved by the Legislative Assembly but be developed with limited political interference. In the international area, the
Caribbean region has some successful examples of a similar approach. For instance, in 2012 the Dominican Republic
adopted their National Development Strategy 2030, which is a longterm plan for development that was enacted into law
to ensure continuity in its implementation. The National Development Plan 2030 for Dominican Republic has clear
infrastructure goals and indicators.


Puerto Rico’s infrastructure systems need comprehensive and consistent maintenance programs and databases. A lack
of programmed funding for the comprehensive maintenance of our existing roads, bridges, energy, dams and other critical
networks has severely impacted the lifespan of these assets. Developing comprehensive asset management databases is
a critical first step, as these databases can help determine total funding and maintenance needs. Looking ahead,
infrastructure planning, designing, and constructing should consider the total cost of operating an asset over its lifespan.
Resiliency and sustainability must be factors in determining lifecycle costs. Lessons learned, unique Puerto Rico
characteristics, and climate change should also be considered.


Improve and increase the technical expertise at agencies that own and operate infrastructure so that they can complete
regulatory requirements. Many of Puerto Rico’s agencies have too few technical experts to operate the infrastructure in
accordance with regulations and customer expectations. Additionally, institutional knowledge is not codified in the
agency, but instead may be lost when individuals retire or resign. We need to improve the continuity of the workforce
training to operate and maintain our roads, solid waste, drinking and wastewater infrastructure.


Increase drinking water infrastructure’s capacity and delivery. An estimated 40 to 60% of storage capacity in water
reservoirs is lost due to sedimentation build up. Additionally, an estimated 58% of nonrevenue water is lost as a result of
leaky pipes, tank overflows, and other issues. As a result, residents are subjected to water rationing nearly every year,
despite significant annual rainfall. To fix this, we need sediment management in reservoirs to restore capacity, improved
metering of treated water, better data collection to determine the condition of pipelines and a more regular line renewal
and replacement program. Additionally, new funding and financing should be secured from all levels of government.


Solid waste infrastructure needs immediate action and significant funding. Landfills on Puerto Rico are often lacking an
updated permit or are unregulated, resulting in noncompliance with Environmental Protection Agency standards.
Capacity is also a major challenge, exacerbated by the debris from the 2017 hurricane season. Looking ahead, policymakers
must close open dumps, expand landfills in compliance, monitor closed landfills, increase staff at the Department of
Natural and Environmental Resources, and promote recycling and composting.


The Central Government and municipalities must develop and implement a plan to rehabilitate, reconstruct, and
maintain roads to the highest standards. Most roads in Puerto Rico are owned by municipalities, which often lack
sufficient funding, robust data, and the inhouse expertise or technical experts to build, rebuild and maintain roads to
acceptable standards.

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Economic Analysis

TRENDS IN INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT IN PUERTO RICO

This section of the ASCE Report Card provides an overview of current infrastructure conditions in Puerto Rico and levels
of investment across the infrastructure sectors.


According to the Construction Industry Selected Statistics Report, total investment in infrastructure has been trending
down since fiscal year 2000.


In fiscal year 2000, the value of construction in infrastructure reached a peak of $2.04 billion. Subsequent years reveal a
downtrend to a low of $983.3 million and $1,210.3 million in fiscal years 2017 and 2018, respectively. These are declines
of over 40% with respect to fiscal year 2000. The graph below shows the trend in infrastructure investment for the last
twentyfour (24) fiscal years in Puerto Rico.

Trend in Investment in Infrastructure

Fiscal Years, $ in millions.
To put matters into context, it is important to understand the level of investment in and around fiscal year 2000. The
majority of investment of Puerto Rico’s first energy cogeneration plant occurred in fiscal year 2000, which coincided with
other significant investments by the private sector. Simultaneously, public investment remained at healthy levels in
different infrastructure installations.


Eighteen years later, the scenario was a much different one. In fiscal year 2018, total value of construction in infrastructure
had dropped 41% compared to fiscal year 2000. A clearer picture can be obtained by analyzing total investment into public
and private investment. In fiscal year 2018, the value of private and public construction activity into infrastructure was
down 31% and 51% compared to the level in fiscal year 2000, respectively. The data show that public investment, in
particular, has been in a steep decline since fiscal year 2008. Meanwhile, private investment in infrastructure remained
low for most of the first decade of 2000s, and it was not until fiscal year 2010 that it experienced a notable increase.


In general terms, public investment played a dominant role between fiscal years 2003 to 2008, while private investment
slumped to meager levels. After reaching a peak in 2008, public investment has constantly declined while private
investment took a boost between fiscal year 2010 and 2012. This trend appears consistent with certain policy and
economic fundamental shifts in Puerto Rico. Fiscal year 2008 marked the beginning of the Great Recession. Fiscal
$896.7
$1,372.3
$2,042.1
$1,331.7
$1,281.7
$1,616.2
$1,106.6
$1,685.1
$1,414.9
$983.3
$1,210.3
$700.0
$1,400.0
$2,100.0
1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018




INFRASTRUCTUREREPORTCARD.ORG/PUERTORICO | 9

constraints in Puerto Rico became more evident, which led to a decline in public investment, and forced a more systematic
effort to encourage private investment to compensate for the inability of government to allocate funding and financing
into infrastructure including capital improvements.

Trend in Public and Private Investment in Infrastructure

Fiscal Years, $ in millions.
The trend based on data from fiscal years 2000 to 2018 reveal certain key lessons about infrastructure investment in
Puerto Rico. First, fiscal year 2000 marked the end of a brief period of boosted public and private investment in Puerto
Rico’s infrastructure. Subsequently, between 2002 and 2011, the share of private investment declined dramatically, and
only since 2018 has there been a slight jump in private expenditures. Finally, since 2008, public investment has dragged
the entire level of infrastructure investment in Puerto Rico to historic lows. In short, investment in infrastructure from
both public and private sources have lagged since 2000.


INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT GAP
ASCE asks that investment in infrastructure constitute 3.5% of Gross Domestic Product (“GDP”). This benchmark is
consistent with internationally accepted rule of thumb that at least 3% of GDP should be devoted to infrastructure
investment in advanced economies in order to keep infrastructure updated.


On average, federal, state and local governments in the U.S. spent 2.4% of GDP on infrastructure investment, below the
recommended threshold. However, investment in infrastructure only amounted to 1.2% of GDP Puerto Rico in fiscal year
2018. In fact, significant divestment in infrastructure has occurred for a prolonged period of time. On average, Puerto Rico
has experienced a level of investment in infrastructure of just 1.5% of GDP from fiscal year 2001 to 2018. Fiscal year 2018,
contains the month of September 2017, when Puerto Rico was hit by Hurricane Maria, the most devastating hurricane in
recent history in Puerto Rico. Thus, the data in these series only includes a small portion of postHurricane Maria recovery
spending. The last time investment in infrastructure reached the 3% GDP mark, was in fiscal year 2000, when Puerto Rico
recorded a level of investment equivalent to 3.3% of GDP. The graph below shows the trend in investment level as a
percentage of GDP.

Investment in Infrastructure as a Percentage of Puerto Rico’s GDP
$133.9
$1,054.3
$380.8
$290.7
$874.5
$695.5$727.1
$762.8
$1,197.1
$962.2
$733.7
$953.0
$1,325.8
$287.8
$483.2
0.0
200.0
400.0
600.0
800.0
1,000.0
1,200.0
1,400.0
1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018
Private Investment Public Investment




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Based on the ASCE’s benchmark and the data above, it is reasonable to estimate that Puerto Rico faces an infrastructure
investment gap that ranges from 1.3% to 2.3% of GDP. In other words, on average, Puerto Rico needs to increase
infrastructure investment by $1.3 to $2.3 billion annually in order to reach a desired range of 2.5%3.5% of GDP. Sustained,
robust investment in infrastructure will allow Puerto Rico to address pressing needs across infrastructure sectors.


Furthermore, increased level of investment in infrastructure will provide support for economic growth. The existing levels
of infrastructure investment are not associated with an expanding economy. The graph below portrays a graphical
relationship between infrastructure investment and the evolution of GDP.




Indexed Investment in Infrastructure versus GDP

2.3% 2.3%
2.6% 2.7%
2.5%
3.2%
3.3%
2.7%
2.2%
1.8% 1.7% 1.7%
1.5% 1.6%
1.7%
1.5%
1.1%
1.3%
1.7%
1.5% 1.4%
1.4%
1.0% 0.9%
1.2%
1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018
Indexed GDP
Indexed Investment
Infrastructure